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Jutland Sew-along: Extra - Customizing the Pockets

Jutland Sew-along: Extra - Customizing the Pockets

For today’s sew-along post, let’s talk about pocket customization!

Mountain Pocket Top Stitching Design

First off, due to popular demand, Matt and I have created a template so that you can re-create the mountain top stitching that I added to the Jutland Pants from our photoshoot.

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To use the pocket template, open it in your browser and print it full size.  The template is the largest patch pocket size.  Place the pocket template over your pocket fabric.  Trace the design with a tracing wheel or mark relevant points with pins and then ‘connect the dots’ by free hand drawing between each pin.

I used jean-weight top stitching thread for my pockets but if you would rather use regular polyester thread, you can create a more subtly visible design or you can stitch over your design two or three times to make the design more pronounced.  You could even use two or three different colors of thread as you re-trace the design to create a bit of depth and visual interest!  I only added this stitching to the right hand pocket so that the pants were asymmetrical – but you can do whatever you wish (or create your own design!).

Creating a Screw Driver Pocket

Variation Two of the Jutland Pants includes two slim cargo pockets with flaps that feature velcro closures.  These can be handy for carrying small items such as screws, nails or even dog poop bags :P.  I designed them so that they would not look bulky and hang off the pant legs awkwardly (as I find some cargo pockets are prone to).

(Various pant leg pocket styles on Kühl Pants.  Click on each image to see a larger version.)

While symmetrical cargo pockets are pretty standard on this style of pants, don’t let this limit you!  Why not create your own pockets perfectly suited to the wearer’s needs? Replace one cargo pocket with a welt cell phone pocket, a zipped pocket, a large pleated patch pocket, or, as I am about to show you, a long screw driver pocket!

This pocket is very long and large enough to hold screw drivers deep within the pocket so they don’t slip out.  If you would like to create a shallower pocket so that it ends well before knee level, simply slice off the bottom of the pocket template.

To use the screw driver pocket template, download it and print it at full size.  This template does not include seam allowances but it is graded for all pant sizes so first, to prepare your pattern piece, cut out your desired size and add seam allowances to all edges.

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Cut two pocket pieces from your fabric.  The pocket is double layered for strength and ease of construction.  If you would like to reduce bulk you could cut one pocket from your self fabric and one from your thinner lining fabric.

The pocket sits on the back leg of the pants so you will need to construct the pocket and stitch it to the pant leg before stitching the side seam.  Note that this is long before you add the cargo pockets as directed in the instruction booklet (the cargo pockets are top stitched in place over the completed side seams).  You will also need to add the screwdriver pocket before adding the back patch pockets.

Okay, time to sew the pocket!

Stitching lines

  1. With right sides together, pin the two pocket layers together.  Stitch along the pocket opening, the back edge and the bottom edges of the pocket (the areas indicated with an orange stitching line in the image above).  Do not stitch along the remaining pocket edges.IMGP2538
  2. Trim and grade the seam allowances to reduce bulk.
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  3. Flip the pocket so right sides are out and press flat.  Top stitch and edge stitch along the pocket opening.IMGP2545
  4. Pin the pocket to the pant leg so that the raw pocket side lines up with the pant side seam, the pocket bottom lines up with the cargo pocket placement dots, and the top edge overlaps patch pocket placement marking.  Baste along the raw edges within the seam allowance.  Top stitch and edge stitch along the finished edges.IMGP2546
  5. Continue constructing the pants as directed – add the back patch pocket so it overlaps the top edge of the screwdriver pocket.  Stitch the side seams.  Note that the layers of the screw driver pocket and the knee patches will possibly create too much bulk to create flat fell seams.  You can simply stitch the seam and then create faux flat fell seams by pressing the seam allowances to the back and then top stitching and edge stitching the seam allowances in place.
October 11, 2023
Jutland Sew-Along: Extra - Adding Strengthening Details and Otter Wax

Jutland Sew-Along: Extra - Adding Strengthening Details and Otter Wax

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I’ve finished my two pairs of Jutland Pants for the Jutland Sew-Along!  The finishing touches were lots of fun – I really enjoyed transforming Matt’s regular pair of canvas Jutlands into ‘waxed designer trousers’ with Otter Wax :P.  He’s been waiting in eager anticipation for these pants and I think they’ll be getting a lot of wear!

Today I’ll share some of my thoughts on rivets and strengthening details with you and I will show you a detailed step by step of my Otter Wax application process.

Strengthening Details

Let’s start with a few stitching techniques that you might not find suggested in most trouser pattern instruction booklets (but that can be easily added to any pair of trousers even after they are finished!):

  1. The side seam edge stitching:  Press both seam allowance towards the back and edge stitch through all layers.  This will prevent pants from ripping or stretching out after heavy front pocket use.IMGP2809
  2. The fly ‘bartack':  On this pair I’ve just back stitched excessively at the end of my faux flat fell seam.  You could also do a narrow zig zag stitch (i.e. a buttonhole stitch) for a very professional detail.IMGP2807
  3. The faux flat fell seat seam:  This is much easier than stitching a real flat fell seam along the crotch of the pants and it allows you to position or even clip the seam allowances at the base of the fly so that both the seam allowances and the fly sit flat.IMGP2813

Otter Wax Application

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(Before Waxing)

This is how Matt’s Jutland Pants looked before I added Otter Wax or a button.IMGP2775

I decided to apply Otter Wax to Matt’s Jutlands before attaching the jeans buttons and rivets because I figured the metal hardware would be tricky to wax around and I didn’t want to fill the rivets with pools of wax by accident!  All the same, if you wanted to wax a finished pair of jeans or trousers, you could trim a small chunk of wax off of the bar and use it to get into tight areas.  You could also melt any excess wax off of the rivets and button by using a hair dryer.  For this pair of pants I ended up using 1 1/2 bars to create one medium-heavy coat of wax.

Otter Wax recommends rubbing the wax into the fabric and then simply leaving the garment to cure for 48 hours.  I like to speed up the process considerably and also add a couple layers of wax by pairing the heat caused by friction with the heat of a hair dryer.  Here is the technique that I’ve grown accustomed to:

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Prep an area of fabric by heating it with a hair dryer.  I work on one section at a time when waxing a large project – you can even leave the project partially finished for days on end and come back to it when you have a few spare minutes.  Even though the finished area will have cured, you can simply wax the remaining area and you won’t be able to notice where you left off once the whole garment has cured.

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Hold the area taught with one hand and rub the wax on with the other hand.

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Rub until enough wax has transferred onto the material to fill the weave of the fabric (this is just a suggestion – you can make your coat of wax as thin or as thick as you would like to create a variety of appearances and levels of water resistance!).

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Heat the waxed area with a hair dryer and rub the partially melted wax into the fabric.  I really like how deeply the wax sinks into the fabric when it is melted like this.  The fabric becomes stiffer and the final product feels very dry (and in no way sticky).  You’ll notice that skipping the hair dryer and simply leaving the garment to cure by laying it flat to ‘air dry’ will create a different effect – the wax sits closer to the surface of the fabric and fills any divets caused by the weave of the fibers to create a fabric with less/different texture.

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Continue this process until the entire garment is waxed!  Here are the pants at the half-way point – you can see the very different texture created by the wax:

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Here are the finished pants:

IMGP2794At this point, you could leave it to cure even further than it has or you could proceed to add a second coat of wax.  Sometimes I like to wait a few days to make sure the project is fully and completely cured before adding a thin ‘touch-up’ coat.  This way I can make sure the project is fully water resistant without getting carried away with my second coat and wasting a bunch of wax.

Now that Matt’s Jutland Pants are waxed, they need to be cared for differently than a regular pair of pants.  They can’t be put in the wash of course, because the warm water and soap would remove the wax!  Instead, the waxed pants need to be brushed with a stiff bristle brush to remove dirt.  They can also be placed in the freezer overnight to kill any bacteria and remove any smell (put them in a ziploc bag so they don’t take on whatever smell your freezer might have…mmm frozen soup and lasagna jeans).  If this all sounds a bit weird and maybe a little unhygienic to you, not to worry!  You could carry out this method of cleaning for as long as you can stand and then periodically hand wash the pants by turning them inside out and washing in cold water with a delicate soap designed for hand washing.  Keep in mind that this will likely remove at least a little bit of your wax coating so it is a good idea to keep a bar of Otter Wax on hand to touch up your pants after you’ve hand washed them.  Either that, or you can embrace the gradual wearing of your waxed pants – you’ll notice that as the wax wears off it has greatly assisted in the creation of the coveted worn creases that denim enthusiasts strive for!

There is a considerable history/group of enthusiasts attached to the practice of waxing pants.  Here are a few intriguing links to immerse you in the crazy world of waxed jeans!

  • Heather Lou mentions last year’s waxed jeans craze in her Ginger Jeans Sew-Along post about personalizing your jeans.
  • A YouTube video demostrating how to wax jeans using Otter Wax – so relevant!
  • A post on waxing a variety of fabrics and a discussion of waxed garments from a practical rather than ‘fashion-statement’ standpoint – I linked to this great post when we first launched Otter Wax in our store.
  • A discussion about the various techniques suggested for cleaning waxed jeans on Fashionista.

 Rivet Application Tips:

Once I finished waxing Matt’s Jutlands, I added rivets to both pairs of pants.  Here are some tips to accompany Matt’srivet application tutorial.  Keep in mind that, unlike Matt, I’m not very skilled at wielding a hammer so these tips are catered towards people who might be hesitant about using woodworking tools in the sewing room:

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  • I find the only way I can successfully and strongly apply rivets is to use a very solid metal backing when hammering them in place.  Without the backing my rivets don’t grip very tightly and sometimes fall off after a while.  With the backing, they are SUPER strong.  We use this scrap piece of metal (you can find similar pieces at junk yards, scrap metal stores, or even at hardware stores which often have metal chunks sold as though they were a ‘cutting board’ to use during metal work projects).  Alternatively, you can use the fiddly little metal backers that are often sold with snap and rivet kits in the sewing store.  If you plan to make lots of pants featuring rivets, I highly recommend getting yourself a nice solid and heavy piece of metal – it works WAY better!IMGP2811
  • While Matt warns not to hammer too hard when applying your rivets and jeans buttons for fear of tearing through the metal (especially when attaching jeans buttons), I found I had to hammer harder than I was expecting.  That being said, start by hammering your first rivet gently, pause and see if you can pull the rivet apart, and if you can, increase the strength of your hammering gradually until there is no way you can separate the two rivet pieces.  It’s better to air on the side of caution than destroy your little rivet with excessive force!IMGP2818
  • Be creative with your rivet placement to create ‘designer’ pants.  I tend to skip change pockets altogether (and have not included a pattern piece for this tiny little pocket with the Jutland Pants pattern) because big manly fingers have such trouble accessing anything placed in that pocket so it just goes unused.  We didn’t want to limit you when using our Jeans & Pants Essential Notions Kit so we included six rivets – enough to secure a change pocket and the two front pockets just as you would find on classic denim jeans.  You can use these six rivets anywhere you like though!  I decided to apply six rivets to my uncle’s back pockets to make them SUPER strong :)

Thank you for joining in on our Jutland Sew-Along!  I hope you’ve had time to finish any pairs you intended as Christmas presents.  I’ll be posting my two pairs of finished pants next week and would love to feature yours on our blog if you have a chance to email or post photos!  Email us at info@threadtheory.ca or #JutlandPants.

October 11, 2023
Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 1 - Materials

Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 1 - Materials

Welcome to the Jutland Work Pants Sew-along! I (Adrianna) look forward to guiding you through creating your pants! Depending on the variation you choose, the supplies you need will differ slightly. You also have several fabric options, whether you want your pants to be more rugged, casual, or athletic. Let's begin by examining some useful tools.

Valuable Tools to have on hand:

  • Tailor's Clapper: A tailor's clapper is a great tool to add to your sewing space or you can improvise with materials you have on hand (Morgan's grandmother used to run freshly steamed seams over the edge of her sewing table to flatten them further). The clapper helps to set seams when pressing to give a nice flat finish. You can also use the clapper on bulky seam areas to flatten the fabric to get under your presser foot more easily. 

  • Seam Jumper: The seam-jumper or Jean-a-ma-jig tool is crucial to sewing over bulky seams on a home sewing machine, even heavy-duty machines. The Jean-a-ma-jig helps to raise the presser foot when stitching so it doesn't get caught on a seam ridge. You can also improvise with a thick piece of cardboard or other sturdy material cut to the necessary shape.

 

 

Notions

  • 1/2" - 1" (1.3 - 2.5 cm) diameter button (jeans button or sewn on).
  • 6" (15 cm) zipper, preferably metal. 

  

  • Thread: You will need regular polyester thread (which is stronger than cotton) . Choose something to match the color of your fabric. You may also want optional thicker topstitching thread in a matching or pleasing contrasting color. You could try Gutermann Extra Strong Thread, which is less thick than topstitching thread.  This allows you to skip the hassle of re-threading the machine each time you need to topstitch as it can be used for seams and topstitching.  My machine is never pleased when sewing with thick thread (it binds up when I backstitch), so I prefer to switch back and forth to ensure that my seams are strong and backstitched securely before I topstitch them. If using topstitching thread, it is essential to only use topstitching thread on the needle side of your machine and regular thread in the bobbin. Most machines do not handle topstitching thread in the bobbin.

 

  • Variation 2: Hook and Loop (Velcro) for the cargo pockets

  • Optional: If you are wanting the rugged look of waxed canvas but haven't sourced a factory-waxed material, you can apply Otterwax or similar fabric wax to canvas fabrics to make them water resistant.
  • Optional: Rivets for a more rugged look.

Okay, let's move on to discussing our actual fabric options! As you'll see, the Jutland Pants are a very versatile design with the choice of fabric dictating whether the end result is suitable for activewear, workwear, or a casual daily wardrobe.

FABRIC

  • Variation 1: Trouser weight wovens (light to medium weight) such as twill, corduroy, wool blends, denim, and gabardine.

Corduroy from Black Bird Fabrics

  

8oz Cotton Twill from Merchant & Mills

  • Variation 2: Trouser weight wovens similar to Variation 1 or materials suited to the intended use of the pants. For example, choose water-resistant cotton or synthetic blends designed for active wear (such as Ripstop) if creating hiking or mountain biking pants.

Ripstop from Fabric Wholesale Direct

  • Both Variations: Pocket linings such as broadcloth, quilting cotton, or other substantial, tightly woven cotton or cotton blends.
  • Optional Lining: Choose a lightweight material suited to the intended purpose of the pants. For example, choose a cozy flannel material if you are sewing work pants for winter construction. If you are sewing waterproof hiking pants, choose a lightweight mesh or cotton that will be comfortable against the skin and wick away sweat. 

Flannel Shirting from Black Bird Fabrics

  

  • Lightweight Woven Fusible Interfacing: You will need lightweight interfacing for the facing, waistband, fly, and optional cargo pocket flap pieces. Choose a lightweight woven or knit fusible interfacing. Depending on the sturdiness and thickness of the fabric you use for your pants, you might not want any additional stiffness from interfacing. Choose a lightweight woven or knit interfacing to reinforce the fabric without adding stiffness.
Lightweight Woven Fusible Interfacing from Core Fabrics

 

Fabric Sources

Canada

Fabrications Ottawa is a great online shop with a stock of Cone Mills US-made S-gene denim in multiple weights! 

Blackbird Fabrics - an online shop just across the water from me!  Caroline often has an excellent selection of denim in stock and occasionally gets in a supply of coveted Cone Mills.

Core Fabrics - Heather-Lou is known for her excellent women's jeans patterns.  She stocks jean-making kits, including all the notions you need and high-quality denim.  They often sell out fast, but you might be in luck snagging a non-stretch fabric kit since these are less in demand than the stretch denim needed for her Ginger Jeans pattern.

Simplifi Fabric - An online shop focused on organic and ecologically friendly fabrics!  They have a great selection of denim and canvas.

USA

Stylemaker Fabrics - An organized selection of denim in various weights and amounts of stretch.

Britex Fabrics - They have a few well-priced Japanese selvage denim worth a peruse!

Bolt Fabric Boutique - They have a range of canvas, denim, twill, and water-resistant fabrics that are always stocked. 

Fancy Tiger Crafts - An excellent array of denim from various manufacturers - all well-labeled so you can compare the differences.  I like the US-made bull denim choices in particular.  Bull denim is dyed after weaving to produce a uniform color (whereas regular denim features an indigo warp thread and white weft thread).

Harts Fabric - A comprehensive selection of quite affordably priced denim.  I especially like the look of the wide denimwhich would save a lot of fabric when cutting out men's larger sizes.

UK

Merchant & Mills - An extensive range of high-end denim very suitable for men's jeans - you might like to make a mock-up first due to the price point of these quality fabrics!

Empress Mills - Some very affordable denim in a variety of weights.  A great way to test out a pair of jeans without a considerable investment!

Croft Mill - Another selection of affordable denim and some interesting choices, including prints, pre-washed, broken twill weave, extra wide, etc.

 

Preparations

Before we continue with the sew-along, make sure to pre-wash your fabric. 

You do not need to wash your fabric if you are using a pre-treated or specialty outerwear fabric, such as water-resistant canvas. Instead, follow the fabric care guides for your fabric.

October 11, 2023
Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 2 - Choosing a Size & Fit Options

Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 2 - Choosing a Size & Fit Options

Today, for the Jutland Sew-Along, we are talking about fit. When deciding which size to sew up, we recommend comparing the measurements of your body and a ready-to-wear garment that fits you well to our measurement charts. Here is a tutorial on how to measure a ready-to-wear pair of pants. Note the differences in the Jutland Pants' ease, rise, and inseam length to your RTW garment and body measurements. 
  
  
Here is a chart to refer to once you've created your first muslin/wearable mock-up of the Jutland Pants (or any other men's pants pattern). Please look at the numbered areas in the diagram below and treat them like a checklist. Are there any strange drag lines or folds of fabric visible?
  
 
 
   
Usually... Horizontal Lines and Folds = The pants are too tight somewhere
Vertical Lines and Folds = The pants are too loose somewhere
  
  
1. Fitting problem: Large Stomach (resulting in a big difference between the natural and trouser waist measurements). 
  
What it looks like: Buckling and tight waistband while seat and legs fit nicely
  
Potential Solution: Add width to the waist area, blending to the hip at the side seams of the front and back pattern pieces. Make sure to increase the waistband length by the same amount you've added to the pants. 
  
  
2. Fitting problem: Curved or Straight Hips
  
What it looks like: Actual hips are more curved than pants - horizontal lines (representing tension) stretch across the fly area. Actual hips are straighter than pants - vertical lines (fabric folds) along side seams in the hip area. Fabric can be easily pinched away from the hips.
  
Potential Solution: Adjust the side seam lines on the front and back pieces. Make the side seam lines more curvy or straight, depending on your ideal fit. NOTE: The Jutland Pants pattern was drafted to have straighter seams and leg shape. 
  
Here is a tutorial on blending between sizes for our Jedediah Pants. You can apply the same techniques for the Jutland Pants pattern pieces.
  
  
  
3. Fitting problem: Muscular Thighs 
  
What it looks like: Horizontal strain lines in the thigh area. Even if the fit problem isn't pronounced enough to make many strain lines, the wearer will notice little mobility in their pants (when they try to lift their legs to go upstairs in particular).
  
Potential Solution: Add width to legs in thigh area - from crotch to knee level. Adjust the side seam, inseam, front, and back in equal amounts. 
  
  
4. Fitting problem: Long or Short Legs 
  
What it looks like: Pants usually fit at the waist but are too long or too short at the hem.
  
Potential Solution: Fix this BEFORE cutting out your fabric so that the shape of the legs is not altered (by cutting off fabric before hemming). Do this by shortening or lengthening the pattern pieces using the "lengthen or shorten here" lines. See this tutorial on how to do this!
Note: The inseam lengths of the front and back pattern pieces are intentionally different. When sewn together, the pieces must be eased in the thigh area. This creates a good fit as the fabric wraps around the inner thigh. When adjusting the length of the pattern pieces, adjust each leg the same amount rather than make them the same size. 
  
  
5. Fitting problem: Strain Across Hip and Thigh Area 
  
What it looks like: Horizontal strain lines present across the hips and thighs—misshapen pockets (pulled due to strain). The waistband fits, and the leg width is suitable, so choosing a larger size wouldn't be a solution. 
  
Potential Solution: Analyze where the pants seem most tight and analyze the body shape. Are the person's hips curved? Is the person's bottom rounded? Do they have large thighs? If you are fitting a muslin, try releasing specific seams (the Center Back Seam or the Side Seam) over the strained areas. Whichever released seam erases the horizontal strain lines indicate the area to be adjusted. Refer to Fitting Problems 2, 3, 6 and 8. 
  
  
  
6. Fitting problem: Round or Flat Buttocks
  
What it looks like: Round Buttocks - Horizontal strain lines are present across the hips, side seam is possibly misshapen due to tightness. The Center Back seam is likely curved inwards to match the body's curve (i.e., a wedgie!)
  
Flat Buttock - Vertical fabric dimples and folds are present on the Pants Back. Excessive fabric is pooling at the side seams. The pants seat looks baggy and unflattering. 
  
Potential Solution: Perform a "Large or Small Seat Adjustment" to add or remove room in the seat area. Don't worry; it's simple! Here are some excellent tutorial links from Seamwork and Closet Core patterns. 
  
  
  
7. Fitting problem: Waistband Gapes
  
What it looks like: The top of the waistband gapes outwards while the seat and legs of the pants fit well. 
  
Potential Solution: A person's waist and hip measurement differs from the proportions the pattern is drafted for. Shorten the waistband to suit the person's measurements and taper the pants slightly by increasing the width of any darts and grading in the side seams. See our Grading Between Sizes tutorial!
  
  
8. Fitting problem: Wedgie Effect
  
What it looks like: The Pants curve at the center back seam inwards. They feel tight as though constantly threatening to "wedgie" the wearer!
  
Potential Solution: Add room to the Pants Back and change the shape of the crotch curve. Refer to the "Large or Small Seat Adjustment" tutorial. If the tightness feels like it extends along the entire curve (as opposed to only high on the buttocks), refer to Fitting Problem 9.  
  
  
9. Fitting problem: Crotch Curve Too Short or Too Long
  
What it looks like: Crotch Curve Too Short - There is not enough room in the pants. The waistband is likely dragging downwards. The crotch feels too tight along the entire curve.
  
Crotch Curve Too Long - There is too much room in the pants. The crotch appears proportionally too low and baggy, as though the pants are worn on the hips. 
  
Potential Solution: Change the shape of the crotch curve to suit the body shape. Draw a different crotch curve that is either steeper or shallower. Make minor adjustments - a little goes a long way! Use a curved ruler for the best results. If the wearer is only rounded on the back (large buttocks and flat stomach), add length to only the Pants Back crotch curve. 
  
  
10. Fitting problem: Muscular Calves
  
What it looks like: There is not enough room below the knees of the pant legs (sometimes the case with tapered pants). Horizontal lines stretch across the pants over the calves. The pant legs continuously ride up throughout the day.
  
Potential Solution: Reduce the taper of the pant leg from the knee to the hem.
  
October 11, 2023
Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 3- Assemble Front Legs

Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 3- Assemble Front Legs

We will assemble the front legs in today's portion of the Jutland Pants Sew Along. You will need your front leg pieces, front pocket linings, and facing pieces, and for Variation 2, the front knee patch pieces.
  
  
Prepare Front Pieces
  
We will start by applying interfacing to the wrong side of the left front piece (as if you were wearing them) on the fly extension. Cut a strip of interfacing about 1" to 1.5" (2.5 - 3.8cm) wide and apply it to the wrong side of the fly extension, following the manufacturer's instructions. Trim away the excess interfacing that is not attached to the fabric. 
  
  
Assemble Front Pockets
  
Staystitch 5/8" (1.5 cm) from the curved edge around the front pocket facing pieces. These staystitching lines will be helpful when turning the fabric under in later steps. This also gives you a guide on where to clip to.
  
  
  
Clip notches into the seam allowances to the staystitching line. Be very careful not to clip into or past the staystitching lines. Cutting notches into the seam allowances reduces bulk when they are turned under.
  
Press the seam allowances to the wrong side of the fabric, following the curve of the staystitching lines. Turn the fabric towards the wrong side so you can't see the staystitching lines from the front - or you can remove the stitching if it is still noticeable. 
  
Match the facing pieces to the pocket linings. The wrong side of the pocket facing will match the right side of the pocket lining. Pin in place, aligning the raw edges and ensuring the pocket facing is flat. 
  
  
  
Stitch the facing to the pocket lining by edgestitching along the curved edge of the pocket facing. 
If you want your stitches to be more visible or pop, use a contrast color or topstitching thread for all visible stitching!
  
  
  
I will now be referring to the "right side of the pocket lining" as the side with the pocket facing attached. 
  
With the right sides together, match one front pocket lining piece to one front leg piece along the curved pocket opening edge. Pin in place, aligning the raw edges.
  
  
  
Stitch together at 5/8" (1.5 cm).
  
  
Trim and grade the seam allowances, making the pocket lining seam allowance slightly narrower.
  
  
  
Make small clips into both seam allowances perpendicular to the stitch line. No need to over-clip, clip every 1" (2.5 cm) or so. 
  
  
  
Fold the pocket lining away from the stitch line. Understitch along the pocket lining, catching the seam allowances underneath. Understitching helps keep the seam allowances in place while also helping to create a smooth curve when pressing the pocket lining to the wrong side of the front leg. 
  
  
  
Turn the pocket lining to the wrong side of the front leg and neatly press the pocket opening. For a professional finish, turn the seam slightly to the wrong side. This will help to prevent the pocket lining from showing from the right side. 
  
  
  
  
To finish the curved pocket edge, topstitch 3/8" (1 cm) away from the curved edge and then edgestitch at 1/8" (3 mm). 
  
  
  
We will now be finishing the pocket lining with a French seam along the bottom of the pocket. 
First, fold the pocket along the vertical notches so the wrong sides are together, and the two layers along the curved bottom edge are lined up. Pin.
  
  
Stitch from the folded edge to the side seam using a 3/8" (1 cm) seam allowance.
  
  
Next, trim both seam allowance edges to be 1/8" (3 mm) wide.
  
  
  
Flip the pocket around so that the right sides are together. Neatly turn the corner and press along the curved seam. Stitch along the curved edge again, using a 1/4" (6 mm) seam allowance to enclose the raw edges. Now you have a tidy French seamed pocket!
  
  
Align the top and side edges of the pocket bag and front leg. Baste along the top and side edges to keep the pocket positioned correctly.
  
  
  
Variation 2: Front Knee Patch
  
Here, I will show you how to add knee patch reinforcement to the front legs. If you would like to create functional knee patches where you can add and remove knee pads, here are two different ways to achieve that! Here is a tutorial on how to make your own knee patches from batting, and here is a tutorial on how to use store-bought knee pads. 
  
Fold under the top and bottom edges of the knee patch pieces at 5/8" (1.5 cm). 
  
  
  
Match the wrong side of the knee patch to the right side of the front leg. Align the notches and raw edges along the inseam and side seam. Ensure the knee patch is nice and flat against the front leg and pin in place.
  
  
  
Along the top and bottom edges of the knee patch, edgestitch 1/8" (1 cm) from the folded edge and then topstitch 3/8" (3 mm) from the folded edge through all layers. 
Baste along the inseam and side seam edges. 
  
October 11, 2023
Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 4- Assemble the Back Legs

Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 4- Assemble the Back Legs

Today's sew-along will focus on the Jutland Pants Variation 2 Patch Pockets. Here is a tutorial on how to create the Variation 1 Welt Pockets. And here is an extra post including printable pattern pieces to customize the shape and topstitching of your pockets.
To sew the pockets as per the instructions, follow the sew-along below: 
  
  Assemble Back Patch Pockets 
  
Serge, bind, or zig-zag the top edges of the patch pocket pieces.
  
  
    
Fold the top of the pocket along the notched fold line so that the right sides of the fabric are together.
Stitch the corners down at 5/8" (1.5 cm) through all layers. 
  
  
  
Trim the seam allowances to 1/4" (6 mm). 
  
  
Flip the sewn part of the pocket right sides out. Use a point turner to push out the corners and press.
Fold under the remaining seam allowance edges at 5/8" (1.5 cm).
Press carefully so that the pocket appears crisp and square. 
  
  
Stitch down the top of the pocket. 
  
  
Make Back Darts
  
Sew the small shaping dart on the Pant Back by bringing the fabric to meet at the notches and sewing from the notches to the marked point. Instead of backstitching at the mark point, sew off the fabric and leave two strings long enough to hand tie a knot. This will eliminate any potential puckering at the dart point. 
  
  
  
Press dart towards center back.
  
  
Attach Back Patch Pockets
  
Match the wrong side of one back patch pocket to the right side of one back leg, aligning the corners of the pocket with the markings on the back leg. Pin in place.
  
  
  
Edgestitch 1/8" (3 mm) from the pocket edge around the pocket through all layers. Backstitch thoroughly at each top corner. Then, topstitch 3/8" (1 cm) away from the pocket edge. 
  
  
Variation 2: Reinforced Back Hem
  
Fold the top edge of the Hem Reinforcement pieces to the wrong side at 5/8" (1.5 cm) and neatly press. 
Match the wrong sides of the reinforcement pieces to the right sides of the back leg hem. Align the top folded edge of the reinforcement with the notches on the back leg. Align the side notches of the reinforcement with the notches on the back leg. 
  
Edgestitch 1/8" (3 mm) from the top folded edge of the reinforcement piece. Then, topstitch 3/8" (1 cm) from the folded edge. Baste the reinforcement pieces in place along the three raw edges (sides and hem). 
  
October 11, 2023
Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 5 - Sew Inseams and Sideseams

Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 5 - Sew Inseams and Sideseams

Today, I will show you how to sew the inseam and side seams of the Jutland Pants.
The Jutland Pants are constructed with flat-felled seams on both the inseam and side seams for a rugged look. If you do not wish to do traditional flat-felled seams, you can do mock flat-felled seams or stitch the seams and then finish the seam allowances with a serge or binding. 
  
  
Side Seams
  
  
With the wrong sides together, match one front leg to one back leg at the side seam. Pin.
If you use topstitching thread, position the legs so the front leg faces up. 
Stitch the side seam at 5/8" (1.5 cm).
  
  
  
Press the seam allowances open.
  
  
  
  
This part is essential to ensure the flat-felled seam is finished correctly. Trim the back leg seam allowance only to a scant 1/4" (6 mm).
  
  
  
Now, press the front leg seam allowance towards the back. Fold the front seam allowance to be 3/8" (1 cm) wide, covering the back seam allowance.
Press well and pin in place.
  
  
  
Edgestitch along the folded edge of the seam allowance.
  
  
  
  
Variation 2: Cargo Pocket
  
Variation 2 of the Jutland Pants includes two cargo pockets with pocket flaps sewn over the side seams. For this variation, you need to sew on the cargo pockets while the side seam fabric is flat before sewing the inseam.
  
First, fold and press the pleats on the cargo pockets. Do this by matching the notches and following the directions in the instructions.
  
  
  
Finish the top edge of the pocket using a serge, zig-zag, or binding.
  
  
  
Fold down the top edge of the pocket at the notches, matching the right sides together. Sew the corners at 5/8" (1.5 cm).
  
  
  
Trim the pocket corners. 
  
  
  
Turn the top of the pocket right side out. Use a point turner for the corners and neatly press.
Stitch along the top of the pocket through all layers about 1" (2.5 cm) down from the folded edge.
  
  
Cut four hook and loop squares 1" x 1" (2.5 cm x 2.5 cm).
  
  
Sew two squares onto the top of the pocket piece.
  
  
  
Match the wrong side of one cargo pocket to the right side of one side seam. Align the corners of the cargo pocket with the markings on the pants.
  
Pin the pocket in place.
  
  
  
Edgestitch 1/8" (3 mm) away from the side and bottom edges of the pocket through all layers. Make another row of stitching 3/8" (1 cm) away from the side and bottom edges of the pocket.
  
  
  
  
If you haven't already, apply interfacing to the wrong sides of two pocket flap pieces. 
  
Match one interfaced pocket flap to one un-interfaced piece with right sides together.
Stitch around the edges at 5/8" (1.5 cm), leaving the top long edge unsewn. 
  
  
  
  
Trim and grade the seam allowances. Clip the corners.
  
  
  
  
Turn the pocket flap right side out. Use a point turner for the corners and press well.
  
  
  
  
Edgestitch 1/8" (3 mm) from the edge of the pocket flap, leaving the top open.
Make another row of stitching 3/8" (1 cm) away from the edge of the pocket flap.
  
  
  
Measure 1/2" (1.3 cm) from the pocket and pin or draw a straight placement line.
  
  
  
  
Align the raw edge of the pocket flap with this line. Fold the pocket flap down towards the pocket as if sewn, and mark where the hook and loop squares meet on the pocket flap.
  
  
  
  
Stitch two squares of hook and loop to the inner side of the pocket flap at the markings.
  
  
  
  
With the hook and loop squares facing up, match the pocket flap to the 1/2" (1.3 cm) line above the pocket. Pin in place.
  
  
  
  
Stitch the pocket flap to the pants, stitching 5/8" (1.5 cm) up from the raw edge of the pocket flap through all layers. 
  
  
  
  
Trim the seam allowance of the pocket flap to 1/4" (6 mm).
  
  
  
  
Fold and press the pocket flap down towards the pocket.
  
Stitch 3/8" (1 cm) down from the top folded edge of the pocket flap encasing the seam allowance. Make another stitch line 1/8" (3 mm) away from the folded edge.
  
Repeat for the other side seam and cargo pocket pieces.
  
  
  
  
Inseam
  
Now, we will sew the inseam with a flat-felled seam. If your pants fabric is too bulky, or you are sewing a smaller size and the leg opening is too narrow and awkward to do this technique, you can stitch the seam and finish the seam allowances together.   
  
  
Match the front and back legs together at the inseam with the wrong sides together. Pin. 
  
  
  
  
If you use topstitching thread, position the legs so the front leg faces up. Stitch the side seam at 5/8" (1.5 cm). Press the seam allowances open.
  
This part is essential to ensure the flat-felled seam is finished correctly. Trim the back leg seam allowance only to a scant 1/4" (6 mm).
  
Now, press the front leg seam allowance towards the back. Fold the front seam allowance to be 3/8" (1 cm) wide, covering the back seam allowance.
  Press well and pin in place.
  
  
  
Turn the pant leg wrong side out.
  
  
  
  
Starting at the seat edge of the inseam, edgestitch 1/8" (3 mm) away from the folded edge along the entire inseam.
  
  
  
  
This time, you will work in a tunnel formed by the pant leg, which will feel quite constricting. Just keep pausing (with the sewing machine needle in the down position so your fabric doesn’t slip) to adjust your fabric slightly, and you will be able to get to the end of the tube!
  
  
Repeat for the other pant leg!
  
  
October 11, 2023
Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 6: Sew the Fly

Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 6: Sew the Fly

  The instructions for sewing the Jutland Pants Fly Zipper may differ slightly from other patterns you have sewn. Some sewing patterns will have you sew up the fly at the beginning of the sewing process to work with flatter pieces and less bulk. The Jutland Pants, on the other hand, have you sew the fly near the end of the sewing process to allow for easy application of the cargo pockets and a little bit of a sewing warm up before you tackle this involved step!
  
  
Sew the Seat Seam
  
Finish the seat seam and fly-facing edges before you sew up the seat seam. Options include serging, zig-zagging, or binding. If you use a bulkier material, you may want to avoid binding for the seat seam and use the alternative methods instead. Binding is an excellent option for lighter-weight pant fabrics. 
  
  
  
Turn the pants legs so that one is right side out and the other is wrong side out.
  
  
Place the leg that is turned right side out inside of the leg that is wrong side out. Align the legs along the front and back seat seams, and align the inseams. Pin.
  
  
  
Stitch the seat seam together at 5/8" (1.5 cm) starting from Center Back and sewing towards the front. Stop stitching 1/2" (1.3 cm) below the zipper placement notch (the horizontal notch on the fly extensions). Check that your inseams line up nicely, and stitch over the entire seam 1 - 2 more times for added reinforcement. This area of the pants gets a lot of strain and needs to be sewn very strongly! Use a shorter stitch length while stitching this seam for added strength. Wait to press the seam allowances. 
  
  
  
Fold the fly extensions on the front pieces to the wrong side according to the notches.
  
The Left Front (as if you were wearing them) will be folded and pressed at the notch farthest from the curved edge. 
  
  
  
The Right Front (as if you were wearing them) will end up being behind the Left Front, creating a smaller facing and a 1/4" ( 6 mm) extension. Fold and press the Right Front extension at the notch closest to the curved edge.
  
  
  
  
  
Fold the zipper shield in half lengthwise, with the wrong sides together. Bind, zig-zag, or serge the long curved raw edges together.
  
  
  We will now be fastening the zipper to the fly shield. You can secure the zipper in place on the fly shield in a couple of ways. One way is by using pins. For this method, with the zipper teeth facing the right side up, match the left edge of the zipper tape with the curved edge of the fly shield. Pin along the left-hand side of the zipper to keep it in place.
  
My (Adrianna) preferred method of securing zippers in place for stitching is by using wash-away tape. The wash-away tape acts like a double-sided sticky tape that will disappear after washing your garment.
  
First, trim off a strip of tape from the roll about the length of your zipper to use the wash-away tape. The wash-away tape is relatively sticky, so if it extends over the zipper's edges, it may start sticking to other parts of fabric or threads and get in the way. 
  
Flip the zipper over so the wrong side of the zipper teeth are showing. Place the sticky side of the tape along the right-hand side of the zipper. Using your finger, press the tape along the zipper so that it sticks.
  
Carefully peel the paper away from the tape to reveal another sticky side!
  
  
Flip the zipper teeth to be facing right sides up. Place the zipper's sticky side with the fly shield's curved edge. Using your finger, press along the zipper to stick it in place.
  
  
**If you used the pinning method, baste the zipper to the fly shield using a zipper foot.
  
If you are using wash-away tape, continue below.
  
With the zipper and shield facing right sides up, cut another strip of wash-away tape about the length of the zipper. Place the sticky side down on the left-hand side of the zipper. Using your finger, press the wash-away tape onto the zipper so that it sticks.
  
Carefully peel away the paper from the wash-away tape to reveal another sticky side.
  
  
  
  
With the right sides of the fabrics and zipper facing up, match the zipper and fly shield to the right front of the pants (as if you were wearing them). Position the folded edge of the center front about 1/4" (6 mm) away from the zipper teeth. 
  
Press along the center front edge using your finger so that it sticks to the zipper and fly shield.
  
Using your zipper foot, edgestitch 1/8" (3 mm) away from the folded edge through all front, zipper, and fly shield layers.
  
  
Now unfold the fly extension on the left front. Position the center fronts of both legs to match the right sides together. 
  
  
With the right sides together, match the unsewn side of the zipper with the fly extension on the left front.
  
  
  
Using your zipper foot, stitch the zipper to the left front. Make one stitch line close to the zipper teeth. Make a second row of stitching right along the outer edge of the zipper tape. 
  
  
  
Position the pants facing right side up to look at the center front. Refold the left fly extension and see how the fronts and zipper lay. Check to ensure the fabric is laying flat, and there are no tension, puckers, or folds in the fabric. 
  
Fold the zipper shield out of the way. Pin the left front fly extension in place.
  
Using the template, draw a J-stitch line on the left front.
  
  
  
Stitch along the J-stitch marking. If you want to create a double row of stitching to match the topstitching on the front pockets, make another row of stitching 1/4" - 3/8" (6 - 10cm) away from the first one.
  
You can either echo the same curve the entire length or taper the curve so that it ends at the same point as your first line of stitching.
  
  
  
Finish Seat Seam
  
Press the seam allowances of the seat seam towards the left leg (as if you were wearing them). Topstitch along the seam through all layers, 3/8" (1 cm) away from the seat seam line. If you made two rows of stitching on the front pockets and J-stitch, make another row of stitching 1/8" (3 mm) away from the seat seam line. 
  
  
  
  
For reinforcement, make a bar tack along the bottom edge of the J-stitch where the seat topstitching, J-stitch lines, and zipper opening meet. 
  
  
October 11, 2023
Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 7 - Belt Loops and Waistband

Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 7 - Belt Loops and Waistband

We are now in the homestretch of the Jutland Pants sew-along! We will now finish the top details of the pants - the waistband and belt loops.
  
  
Install Pocket Rivets
  
At the top of the front pocket openings, make a marking 5/8" (1.5 cm) down from the raw waistline edge. 
 
Following the manufacturer's instructions, install rivets to the top of the front pocket openings just below the 5/8" (1.5 cm) marking.
    
Installing the rivets before attaching the waistband and belt loops is easier.
  
  
  
Make Belt Loops
  
Iron the three belt loop pieces as follows: Fold each long edge in 3/8" (1 cm) towards the center of the strip of fabric. Press. Fold the strip in half to enclose the raw edges and press again (just as you would to make binding). Topstitch along either edge to form a flat belt loop piece.
  
Alternatively, you could make a tube sewing with a 3/8" (1 cm) seam allowance and right sides together, flip and then press before topstitching. This method would be best for lighter fabrics, as flipping the tube right side out can be frustrating when using heavier twills or denim!
  
Cut each belt loop piece in half so you now have six pieces. (for Variation 1, you will only need five belt loops, so choose the five pieces with the nicest topstitching).  
  
  
Line each belt loop up with the top edge of the pants with the right
sides together (there is no proper right side for the belt loops –
choose the side where the topstitching looks nicest). Baste the belt loops to the waistline at 1/2" (1.3 cm)
  
Match two belt loops along the front waistline edge, about 1/4" (6 mm), towards the center front from the pocket openings. 
  
  
Match two belt loops to the side seams of the pants. If that is too bulky due to the flat-felled seam, place the belt loops just to the side of the flat-felled side seam on the back waistline edge.
  
Match one belt loop to the center back seam.
  
  
  
  
Attach Waistband
  
Following the manufacturer's instructions, apply interfacing to one waistband piece if you haven't already.
  
With the right sides, match the waistband pieces together along the long folded edge. Stitch together at 5/8" (1.5 cm).
  
Press the seam allowances open. Trim and grade the seam allowances.
  
Finish the un-interfaced side of the waistband using a serge stitch or binding.
  
  
Match the interfaced waistband side to the waistline of the pants with the right sides together. Align the notch of the waistband with the center back seam of the pants. The narrow waistband edges should extend past the center front edges 5/8" (1.5 cm). 
  
  
  
Press the entire waistband and seam allowances up and away from the pants.
  
  
  
At the center front, fold the waistband pieces to be right sides together along the waistband seam.
  
Stitch the narrow edges of the waistband together at 5/8" (1.5 cm).
  
Trim the seam allowances and clip the center front corner.
  
  
  
Turn the waistband right side out. Use a point-turner for the corners of the waistband. Neatly press the top and center front edges of the waistband. 
  
Press the waistband seam allowance under from the center front to several inches towards the front pocket. Leave the rest of the seam allowance as is.
  
  
With the right side of the pants facing up, edgestitch all around the waistband. Check and make sure to catch the folded edges of the waistband underneath as you are sewing.
  
  
  
Press the exposed edge of each belt loop under at 1/4" (6 mm).
  
Fold the belt loops up towards the waistband. Match each belt loop's folded edges with the waistband's top edge. Bar tack the belt loops to the waistband.
  
Press the lower portion of each belt loop to lay flat against the pants.
Bar tack along the lower folded edge of each belt loop, securing them to the pants.
October 11, 2023
Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 8 - Hem and Finishing Details

Jutland Pants Sew-along: Day 8 - Hem and Finishing Details

Now for the finishing touches! We are on the last day of the Jutland Pants sew-along. Here is a tutorial for additional resources on how to apply wax to your finished pants or some fun ways to incorporate rivets. 
  
Hem
  
Try the garment on the soon-to-be wearer to check the length before hemming. Press the hem up 3/4" (2 cm) and again 3/4" (2 cm) to enclose the raw edge.
Stitch 1/8" (0.3 cm) away from the folded hem edge.  
  
  
  
  
Button and Buttonhole
  
Add a buttonhole to the center of the left front waistband. Start the buttonhole 1/2" (1.3 cm) from the edge of the waistband. Sew on or install a corresponding button to the right front.
 
October 11, 2023
Morden Work Pants Sew-along: Day 1 - Gathering Supplies

Morden Work Pants Sew-along: Day 1 - Gathering Supplies


Welcome to the Morden Work Pants Sew-along! I (Adrianna) look forward to guiding you through the process to create your own rugged and beautifully fitted work pants! To create the Morden Work Pants I highly recommend you gather together a few specialty tools and trusted hardware. These will prevent unneccessary struggle when working with bulky seams and rugged material. Here I will walk you through the different things that you may need to install hardware, sew bulky seams, and embellish your pants. 

Useful Tools

  • Tailor's Clapper: A tailor's clapper is a great tool to add to your sewing space if you don't have one already. The clapper helps to set seams when pressing to give a nice clean finish. You can also use the clapper on bulky seam areas to flatten the fabric so it will get under your presser foot easier. 

  • Seam Jumper: The seam-jumper or Jean-a-ma-jig tool is crucial to sewing over bulky seams on a home sewing machine, even heavy-duty machines. The Jean-a-ma-jig helps to raise the presser foot when stitching so it doesn't get caught on a seam ridge. When sewing my pairs of Morden Work Pants I used this tool not only on seams but for stitching the Variation 1 back pockets to the back. I will show in more detail how I used the tool later on in the Sew Along!

  HARDWARE

  • Button: A no-sew jeans button measuring 1/2"-1". 
  • Pocket rivets: Rivets are optional if you are using a fabric other than denim since you could also just bar tack very securely at these pressure points but I don't think rivets are optional if you are sewing with denim.  They are essential to creating the classic strength and appearance of jeans. Closet Core, Core Fabrics, and Kylie and the Machine have wonderful hardware kits that include zippers, buttons, rivets, and tools to install them.

 

  • Optional tools to apply rivets: Some other tools you may use for installing hardware are a rubber mallet, which can be found anywhere from your local fabric or hardware store; and a rivet setter. Rivet setters tend to be a bit more pricey and harder to come across, but if you plan to use hardware details often, this may be a good investment as it is the easiest way to install hardware! 

Essential Notions

   

  • Metal-toothed Zipper: If you can not find the size recommended in the instruction booklet, a longer zipper will do just fine!  I will be showing you how to shorten the zipper during the sew-along.  We carry 7" and 8" jeans zippers in our shop.  

  

  • Thread (Regular and Top-stitching): You will need regular polyester thread (which is stronger than cotton) to match the color of your denim and thicker topstitching thread in a pleasing contrasting color.  Some of our test sewers successfully sewed their entire jeans using Gutermann Extra Strong Thread which is not quite as thick as topstitching thread.  This allowed them to skip the hassle of re-threading their machine each time they needed to topstitch.  My machine is never very happy when sewing with thick thread (it binds up when I backstitch) so I prefer to switch back and forth to ensure that my seams are strong and backstitched securely before I topstitch them. If using topstitching thread it is important to only use topstitching thread on the needle side of your machine, and regular thread in the bobbin. Most machines do not handle well with topstitching thread in the bobbin.

FABRIC

  • If you are creating these pants for casual everyday wear, choose trouser-weight wovens (light to medium weight) such as twill, denim, canvas, and gabardine.
  • Alternatively, use materials suited to the intended use of the pants. For example, for hiking, mountain biking or outdoor work wear pants choose water-resistant cotton or synthetic blends designed for active wear (such as Ripstop).

Here is some inspiration for fabrics and colors pulled from some of our favorite fabric stores mentioned below!

 

  • Pocketing: You will need pocket lining fabric such as broadcloth, quilting cotton, or other strong, tightly woven cotton or cotton blends. If you are making your Morden Pants out of a heavier fabric you can also use the pocket lining fabric to make the fly facing.

Fabric Sources

Canada

Fabrications Ottawa - a great online shop that includes a stock of Cone Mills US-made S-gene denim in multiple weights! 

Blackbird Fabrics - an online shop just across the water from me!  Caroline often has a nice selection of denim in stock and occasionally gets in a supply of coveted Cone Mills.

Core Fabrics - Heather-Lou is known for her excellent women's jeans patterns.  She stocks jean-making kits including all the notions you need and high-quality denim.  They often sell out fast but you might be in luck snagging a non-stretch kit in particular since these are less in demand than the stretch denim needed for her Ginger Jeans pattern.

Simplifi Fabric - An online shop completely focused on organic and ecologically friendly fabrics!  They have a great selection of denim and canvas.

USA

Stylemaker Fabrics - An organized selection of denim in various weights and amounts of stretch.

Britex Fabrics - They have a few very well-priced Japanese selvage denim that is worth a peruse!

Bolt Fabric Boutique - They have a range of canvas, denim, twill, and water-resistant fabrics that are always stocked. 

Fancy Tiger Crafts - A nice array of denim from various manufacturers - all well-labeled so you can compare the differences.  I like the US-made bull denim choices in particular.  Bull denim is dyed after weaving to produce a uniform colour (whereas regular denim features an indigo warp thread and white weft thread).

Harts Fabric - A comprehensive selection of quite affordably priced denim.  I especially like the look of the wide denim which would save a lot of fabric when cutting out men's larger sizes.

UK

Merchant & Mills - A large range of high-end denim very suitable for men's jeans - you might like to make a mock-up first due to the price point of these quality fabrics!

Empress Mills - Some very affordable denim in a variety of weights.  A great way to test out a pair of jeans without a huge investment!

Croft Mill - Another selection of affordable denim and some interesting choices including prints, pre-washed, broken twill weave, extra wide, etc.

 

Preparations

Before we continue with the sew-along, make sure to pre-wash your fabric.  If using denim, I recommend washing it with a cup of vinegar on fairly high heat to set the indigo dye and pre-shrink/pre-soften the denim...unless, of course, you are a denim enthusiast who wants to sew up a pair of raw denim jeans!  In that case, you'll want to keep them stiff and saturated with dye by avoiding washing at all! 

If you are using a pre-treated fabric or specialty outerwear fabric, such as water resistant canvas, you do not need to wash your fabric. Instead, follow the fabric care guides for your fabric.

July 09, 2023
Morden Work Pants Sew-along: Day 2 - How to Fit Your Morden Work Pants

Morden Work Pants Sew-along: Day 2 - How to Fit Your Morden Work Pants

The fit of the Morden Work Pants is very relaxed with a mid-rise. There are knee darts to help with mobility and comfort. We highly recommend making a muslin to test for fit and if you need to make any pattern adjustments. 
  
Some very common adjustments that people need to make to pants patterns are:
  • Adjusting inseam length
  • A front rise or back rise adjustment may be needed if you have a longer or shorter torso, or more or less fullness in those areas than the pattern allows for.
  • Taking in or letting out at the waistband
  • Tapering or widening the leg opening
  • Blending between sizes

  

In this post, I will walk you through how I made adjustments to my pattern to get the best fit.

  
To figure out what size to choose and what adjustments need to be made, you can compare your body measurements to our body measurement chart. If you are between sizes always size up and adjust the pattern down.
  
An easy way to get started is to measure a pair of pants that you already own that fit similarly to the intended fit of the Morden Work Pants. I have a pair of wide-leg jeans that I like the fit of, so I decided to use the measurements of these pants to compare to the garment measurement chart to find my size.  
  
  
To get the most accurate measurements, it's best to measure the garment while it is lying flat on the floor or a table. 
  
Use a measuring tape to measure your garment, not a straight ruler. 
  
Take the waist, hip, front and back rise, inseam, and leg opening measurements. Write down your measurements and compare them to the garment measurement chart in the instruction booklet. If you are between sizes always size up and adjust the pattern down.
  

HOW TO MEASURE YOUR GARMENT

  
 Waist: measure straight across the waistband. Double that length for the waist circumference measurement.
  
  
Hip: Measure straight across the hip line of the pants. The hip line is typically right above the pant legs. Double this length to find the hip circumference.
  
  
Inseam: Extend one pant leg and move the other aside so you can see the seat seam. Start with the edge of your tape measure centered at the seat seam allowance. Measure down the inseam seam allowances to the edge of the hem. Curve your tape measure to match the organic shape of the fabric.
  
  
Leg Opening: Measure straight across the leg opening. Double the length to get the leg opening circumference.
  
  
Front Rise: Position the front of the pants so you can see the entire length from the waistband to the seat seam intersection. Start with the edge of your tape measure at the top edge of the waistband. Measure to the seat seam intersection, curving the tape measure along the center front.
  
  
Back Rise: Position the back of the pants so you can see the entire length from the waistband to the seat seam intersection. Start with the edge of your tape measure at the top edge of the waistband. Measure to the seat seam intersection, curving the tape measure along the center back.
  
  

FIND YOUR SIZE

  
After comparing my garment measurements to the finished garment measurement chart, I determined that I will need to blend between sizes 8 and 10. I will also be making adjustments to the front rise, knee darts, and leg opening.
  
  

ADJUSTING THE PATTERN

Here I will walk you through how I adjusted the Morden Pants pattern to match the fit of my jeans. Because I made a muslin sample, I only adjusted the front and back pieces first. 
  
I traced off all pattern pieces for Variation 1. On the front, back, and back yoke I blended from the waist to the hip between sizes 8 and 10.
  
FRONT RISE: From comparing garment measurements, I only needed to adjust the length of the front rise. The back rise measurement of the pattern is close enough to my pants. 
  
Since I only adjusted the front rise, I cut along the lengthen/shorten line from the center front - to but not through - the side seam creating a hinge in the paper.
  
  
I cut a piece of scrap paper and placed it underneath the front pattern piece. Next, I opened up the cut edges to create a wedge shape that opened 3" at the center front. Once everything was in place I taped the adjusted pattern piece to the scrap paper.
  
  
After making any pattern adjustments it is important to true the pattern. The first thing I did was blend between the center front edges to create a new center front. Next, I added a small amount of paper to the side seam to true the jagged line that was created by making the wedge shape. 
  
  
INSEAM/KNEE DARTS: An important feature to note on the pattern is the front knee darts. The front knee darts need to be positioned where the knee of the wearer is, otherwise, the front leg will not fit correctly. This is why there are lengthen/shorten lines above and below the knee darts on the pattern. The position of the front knee darts may need to be higher or lower on the pattern.
  
When I measured along my inseam to where my knee is compared to the pattern I determined that I had to position the knee darts higher on the leg. 
  
The inseam measurement of my jeans was close enough to the pattern measurement so I did not want to adjust the total inseam length. 
  
  
  
First, I cut along the lengthen/shorten line above the knee darts.
  
  
To move the knee darts up, I overlapped the cut edges by 1 1/4" (3 cm).
  
  
To keep the inseam at 30 3/4" (78 cm) the pattern needed to be lengthened below the knee darts the same amount.
  
To do this, I cut along the lengthen/shorten line below the knee darts and separated the cut edges 1 1/4" (3 cm) placing a scrap piece of paper underneath. I taped the pattern to the paper and trued the inseam and side seam lines.
  
  
LEG OPENING: The leg opening of my jeans is slightly more tapered than the Morden Pants pattern. To get the fit that I wanted I took 3/4" (2 cm) off the leg opening from both the inseam and side seam. I then blended from the knee darts to the hem to create new inseam and side seam lines.
  
  
The same adjustment was made to the lower back pattern piece, blending from the top of the pattern to the hem. Since I was confident this was an adjustment I wanted to keep, I went ahead and repatterned the back hem reinforcement piece to match the new shape of the lower back.
  
  

FITTING THE MUSLIN

    
I basted up a sample in muslin fabric to test out my pattern adjustments. 
  
The reason why we encourage sewing up a muslin, even after making flat pattern adjustments, is that you may find other adjustments need to be made - or you might not like the adjustments you did make -  once the pattern is sewn up in fabric.
  
A very common adjustment made to pants patterns is adjusting the waistband. The Morden Work Pants have a straight waistband to allow for more comfort and mobility. Due to being a straight waistband, however, you may find there is a gap at the top of the waistband at the center back
    
For my pants, the waistband had just a little too much of a center back gap so I decided to take that in.
  
  
After trying on the sample, I realized I should have done a straight size 10 instead of blending to an 8 at the waist. I plan on using my Morden Work Pants for gardening and yard work which will require a lot of ease of movement. The sample fit was just a little too tight around my upper hip area - which you can see from the horizontal drag lines of the fabric - making sitting and bending uncomfortable. 
  
  
Now I will show you how I made the additional adjustments needed after testing out my sample and finishing the adjustments to other important pattern pieces!
  
WAISTBAND
From pinning my sample I determined the amount needed to take out from the top of the waistband. 
  
  
First and most importantly, I traced a new waistband piece that was a size 10.
  
To take the amount off of the top of the waistband only, the pattern piece will now look like the picture below. Since the waistband piece is folded when finished, the center of the pattern piece is technically the "top" of the waistband. I took in the amount needed at the center of the pattern piece and then angled it out to the long edges of the pattern piece.
  
  
FLY FACING AND SHIELD
  
Because I added length to the front rise, I also need to lengthen the fly facing and fly shield pieces to match. Since both pieces are squared off at the top, I simply traced off new pieces that were 3" longer.
  
  
HIP/WAIST AREA
  
Since I determined I needed to use a straight size 10, I added scrap paper to the front and back pattern pieces at the side seam from the thigh area to the top of the piece. I then traced and blended out my pattern to match the size 10 side seam. Lastly, I traced off a size 10 back yoke pattern piece. 
  
July 09, 2023